RADICI A SUD’s two-­week program is designed to reunite Americans with their Southern Italian heritage, offering participants the opportunity to experience first-­hand an exceptionally rich and vibrant culture from which they are now largely disconnected.Designed with 18 – 26 year-­olds in mind,* the program is far more than a chance to travel in the region. It is a focused effort to teach young people about their heritage and cultivate in them an interest in returning to a relatively overlooked region in future years.

*Family members, including people over the age of 26 and/or who are not of Southern Italian descent, are welcome to participate as well.
If your interest has been piqued, check out the links on the side or visit us at http://www.RADICIASUD.com. A presto!

Check out the Southern Italian dialect in this song! 10 points to Gryffindor for anyone who can name all of the dialects. 

(Source: Spotify)

roberthead:

Have I doubt when I’m alone 
Love is a ring, the telephone 
Love is an angel disguised as lust 
Here in our bed until the morning comes..

[Patti Smith - Because the night]

Look at all the awesome people who show up in Sicily! Almost every year, the Teatro Greco in Taormina houses fantastic English-language artists giving some memorable performances. Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin fame (eep!) was there only a few years ago. Come to Sicily with Radici a Sud this summer and catch an awesome concert while there!


“Whoever has the luck to be born a character can laugh even at death. Because a character will never die! A man will die, a writer, the instrument of creation: but what he has created will never die!”                                                           Luigi Pirandello 

Luigi Pirandello(1867-1936) was born in Girgenti, Sicily. He studied philology at Rome and at Bonn and wrote a dissertation on the dialect of his native town (1891). From 1897 to 1922 he was professor of aesthetics and stylistics at the Real Istituto di Magistere Femminile at Rome. Pirandello’s work is impressive by its sheer volume. He wrote a great number of novellas which were collected under the title Novelle per un anno (15 vols., 1922-37). Of his six novels the best known are Il fu Mattia Pascal (1904) [The Late Mattia Pascal], I vecchi e i giovani (1913) [The Old and the Young], Si gira (1916) | [Shoot!], and Uno, nessuno e centomila (1926) [One, None, and a Hundred thousand].But Pirandello’s greatest achievement is in his plays. He wrote a large number of dramas which were published, between 1918 and 1935, under the collective title of Maschere nude [Naked Masks]. The title is programmatic. Pirandello is always preoccupied with the problem of identity. The self exists to him only in relation to others; it consists of changing facets that hide an inscrutable abyss. In a play like Cosí é (se vi pare) (1918) [Right You Are (If You Think You Are)], two people hold contradictory notions about the identity of a third person. The protagonist in Vestire gli ignudi (1923) [To Clothe the Naked] tries to establish her individuality by assuming various identities, which are successively stripped from her; she gradually realizes her true position in the social order and in the end dies «naked», without a social mask, in both her own and her friends’ eyes. Similarly in Enrico IV (1922) [Henry IV] a man supposedly mad imagines that he is a medieval emperor, and his imagination and reality are strangely confused. The conflict between illusion and reality is central in La vita che ti diedi (1924) [The Life I Gave You] in which Anna’s long-lost son returns home and contradicts her mental conception of him. However, his death resolves Anna’s conflict; she clings to illusion rather than to reality. The analysis and dissolution of a unified self are carried to an extreme in Sei personaggi in cerca d’autore(1921) [Six Characters in Search of An Author] where the stage itself, the symbol of appearance versus reality, becomes the setting of the play.The attitudes expressed in L’Umorismo [Humour], an early essay (1908), are fundamental to all of Pirandello’s plays. His characters attempt to fulfil their self-seeking roles and are defeated by life itself which, always changing, enables them to see their perversity. This is Pirandello’s humour, an irony which arises from the contradictions inherent in life.
Taken from Luigi Pirandello’s Nobel Prize Page

Whoever has the luck to be born a character can laugh even at death. Because a character will never die! A man will die, a writer, the instrument of creation: but what he has created will never die!
                                                           Luigi Pirandello 

Luigi Pirandello(1867-1936) was born in Girgenti, Sicily. He studied philology at Rome and at Bonn and wrote a dissertation on the dialect of his native town (1891). From 1897 to 1922 he was professor of aesthetics and stylistics at the Real Istituto di Magistere Femminile at Rome. Pirandello’s work is impressive by its sheer volume. He wrote a great number of novellas which were collected under the title Novelle per un anno (15 vols., 1922-37). Of his six novels the best known are Il fu Mattia Pascal (1904) [The Late Mattia Pascal], I vecchi e i giovani (1913) [The Old and the Young], Si gira (1916) | [Shoot!], and Uno, nessuno e centomila (1926) [One, None, and a Hundred thousand].

But Pirandello’s greatest achievement is in his plays. He wrote a large number of dramas which were published, between 1918 and 1935, under the collective title of Maschere nude [Naked Masks]. The title is programmatic. Pirandello is always preoccupied with the problem of identity. The self exists to him only in relation to others; it consists of changing facets that hide an inscrutable abyss. In a play like Cosí é (se vi pare) (1918) [Right You Are (If You Think You Are)], two people hold contradictory notions about the identity of a third person. The protagonist in Vestire gli ignudi (1923) [To Clothe the Naked] tries to establish her individuality by assuming various identities, which are successively stripped from her; she gradually realizes her true position in the social order and in the end dies «naked», without a social mask, in both her own and her friends’ eyes. Similarly in Enrico IV (1922) [Henry IV] a man supposedly mad imagines that he is a medieval emperor, and his imagination and reality are strangely confused. The conflict between illusion and reality is central in La vita che ti diedi (1924) [The Life I Gave You] in which Anna’s long-lost son returns home and contradicts her mental conception of him. However, his death resolves Anna’s conflict; she clings to illusion rather than to reality. The analysis and dissolution of a unified self are carried to an extreme in Sei personaggi in cerca d’autore(1921) [Six Characters in Search of An Author] where the stage itself, the symbol of appearance versus reality, becomes the setting of the play.

The attitudes expressed in L’Umorismo [Humour], an early essay (1908), are fundamental to all of Pirandello’s plays. His characters attempt to fulfil their self-seeking roles and are defeated by life itself which, always changing, enables them to see their perversity. This is Pirandello’s humour, an irony which arises from the contradictions inherent in life.

Taken from Luigi Pirandello’s Nobel Prize Page

Despite being born in Rome, Sophia Loren spent much of her young life in Naples and clearly still identifies with her Mezzogiorno roots. In an interview with Barbara Walters, she exclaimed, “I’m not Italian, I’m Neapolitan! It’s another thing!” Some of her most acclaimed roles feature her playing  ”salt of the earth” types, similar to the personalities found in Italy’s southern regions. It’s alleged that Vittorio De Sica gave her a role because of her Neapolitan roots. They both knew the dialect and De Sica later remembered her for this, giving her one of her first major roles. For a full list of her films, click here. To read more about her life, click here.

Despite being born in Rome, Sophia Loren spent much of her young life in Naples and clearly still identifies with her Mezzogiorno roots. In an interview with Barbara Walters, she exclaimed, “I’m not Italian, I’m Neapolitan! It’s another thing!” Some of her most acclaimed roles feature her playing  ”salt of the earth” types, similar to the personalities found in Italy’s southern regions. It’s alleged that Vittorio De Sica gave her a role because of her Neapolitan roots. They both knew the dialect and De Sica later remembered her for this, giving her one of her first major roles. For a full list of her films, click here. To read more about her life, click here.

dipot:

Amor and Psyche, fresco in the house of Terentius Neus, Pompeii

dipot:

Amor and Psyche, fresco in the house of Terentius Neus, Pompeii

Reblogga se sei siciliano

justfortry:

e se sei fottutamente orgoglioso di esserlo…    Sicilia <3

Translation: Reblog if you’re Sicilian and proud to be so!

i-am-museek:

SICILIA

fonte: foto 1

fonte: foto 2 & 3

Vintage photos of Sicily. 

50 Best Italian Songs Of The 60’s (imho)

justsomethingrandom:

image

In no particular order:

Read More

Italian Music from the 60’s is especially good for those of you who want to practice those language skills. The pronunciation is much clearer than that of many modern songs and it’ll attune your ear to the lyrical quality of the language. Best of all, you might pick up some vocabulary with very little effort!

Festa di Santa Rosalia in Sicily

Santa Rosalia is the patron saint of Palermo, Sicily’s capital city. As such, she is revered by all Sicilians. In the year 1624, there was a terrible epidemic in the city. As medicine wasn’t as advanced, the people could do little to quell the disease and turned to prayer. Santa Rosalia appeared to one of the Palermitani and directed him to a cave near Monte Pellegrino. She promised that if he was to take the relics there (the saint’s remains) on a procession around the city, the disease would abide. He did as directed and the city was saved. To this day, from the 14 to 15 of July, the relics are processed around Palermo to honor the saint. The festivities include feasting, fireworks, and lively music. Check out the party with Radici a Sud in Sicily summer!  

yannnyan:

urban art-the old version :)

yannnyan:

urban art-the old version :)